Vegan fettucine alfredo

This is something I always make when I try to impress people, it might take a few tries to get the amount of ingredients right but when it works, it works! Vegan, relatively easy &cheap, and delicious. You will need a blender for this (any kind).

(This is a variation of this recipe from oh she glows)

Ingredients:

1 cauliflower, cut into floretsOlive oil (as you see fit)
about 2 cloves garlic
1/2 milk (dairy if you’re not vegan, if you are use any kind, I’ve only ever tried soy)
2 tablespoons lemon juice
salt and pepper to taste
1 1/2 tablespoons cornstarch
Fettucine pasta of choice
Broccoli
Mushrooms (canned is fine)
Parsley (dried is totally fine)

Directions:

Boil the cauliflower until tender, then drain it. Sautée the garlic in some olive oil until it starts to smell. In the blender, add the cauliflower, the cooked garlic, the milk, cornstarch, lemon juice and salt and pepper. Blend until creamy/kind of soup-like. You might need to stop it and scrape the sides or push the cauliflower down, depending on your blender. Cook the pasta together with the broccoli (cut into florets) to save time, and cook the mushrooms with some olive oil. When the pasta and broccoli are ready, mix them with the mushrooms and the sauce. Sprinkle some parsley and you’re done.

I’d say this makes plenty of sauce, and then depending on how many you’re serving just adjust the amount of pasta and vegetables. Enjoy!

(I don’t think it makes for good leftover food because the sauce tends to kind of dry up).

delicious sweet potatoes

everyone i make these sweet potatoes for raves about it! and it’s super easy….

prep time: 5-10 minutes
cook time: 35-45 minutes depending on how the potatoes are cut

ingredients:

  • two sweet potatoes or yams (although really just any potatoes will do)
  • 2 tablespoons oil (veggie, canola, olive, whatever is on hand)
  • 1 packet dry onion soup mix 

alternatively, you can make your own onion soup mix by combining the following spices (edited from allrecipes.com) or something similar to it, substitute and experiment at will:

  • 1/4 cup dried onion flakes
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon parsley flakes
  • 1/8 teaspoon paprika
  • 1/8 teaspoon black pepper

instructions

  1. preheat the oven to 425 degrees fahrenheit
  2. chop the potatoes into whatever size suits you best: big bites, little bites, fries, you choose!
  3. place the potatoes into a large mixing bowl, drizzle in just enough of the oil to coat
  4. mix in the onion soup mix, coating the potatoes
  5. place the potatoes in a single layer on a foil-covered cookie sheet and throw them in the over. start checking for done-ness after 35 minutes. a cooked potato is easy to pierce with a fork. the thinner the pieces, the quicker the bake!

no-more-ramen:

*~vegan chocolate mousse~*

hi from your mod! my boyfriend’s mom sent me this recipe and i can testify that it is not only DELICIOUS, but accommodating of a ton of dietary restrictions!

to make this more affordable, i bet it can be made with nesquik or ovaltine instead of cocoa powder, or any kind of milk rather than almond. items like vanilla extract are great to keep stocked anyway because they last forever. if anyone tries it with substitutions, i’d love for you to submit your take on this yummy, simple dessert! <3

dietary restrictions? we can help!

no-more-ramen:

for new followers, no-more-ramen has an array of tags to help ensure that you can find affordable, yummy recipes that are safe for you to eat! here is a list of our current tags for this —

happy eating, lil’ chefs! <3

now also featuring:

:)

no-more-ramen:

*~tofu parmesan + zucchini spaghetti~*
a relatively simple, quick, and tasty vegetarian and gluten free dinner! this is a special treat i cook for my boyfriend since he’s vegetarian and i’m gluten free.
ingredients
one zucchini
one package extra firm tofu
one egg
spaghetti sauce
salt
pepper
flour (i used gluten free all purpose baking flour)
olive oil / vegetable oil
garlic powder (optional)
red pepper flakes (optional)
italian seasoning (optional)
other veggies to mix with sauce such as onions, spinach, kale, etc (optional)
a tasty cheese that crumbles well, such as goat cheese or shredded parmesan (optional)
tools
knife
cutting board
regular or julienne peeler, such as this one on amazon — it’s only $11 and it’s amazing for peeling everything quickly and easily or turning so many vegetables noodle-shaped!
pan
something to flip the tofu with / stir the pan
how to
first, open the package of tofu and drain. cut the tofu into large, thick slices. you don’t want it to fall apart! now, press the tofu. basically, this means to put paper towels under and on top of it, and then place something heavy on top of the paper towel to squeeze water out. any random book does the trick.
while the tofu is pressing, prep the zucchini. peel it into strips length-wise with the julienne peeler. this can take some practice, but i find it to be very methodical and relaxing once i know how to do it.
put the zucchini aside. crack an agg and whisk it in a bowl. place a paper towel on the counter and put a handful of whatever flour you’re using in it. now you create an assembly line: take a piece of your cut tofu, douse it in egg, and then rub flour all over it until it’s covered. 
take your tofu and place it in the pan with some oil. sprinkle them with your seasonings if you have some available from the optional list above. now heat to medium high and fry those babies! flip them after only a few minutes, whenever they turn golden brown. it’s pretty quick so just be sure to check every minute or so. once they’re crispy on both sides, put them back on the paper towel where you originally put the flour while you prepare the zucchini spaghetti.
if you’re adding any veggies to the sauce, sauté them in the oil leftover from the tofu. once those are soft, add the spaghetti sauce and the zucchini. since the zucchini is so thin, it will cook really quickly, in only a minute or two. at this point, add any of optional seasonings from the ingredient list. 
that’s it! plate your yummy food and sprinkle cheese on the “pasta” if you so desire. dazzle your foodie friends with your allergen inclusive masterpiece, and pat yourself on the back for preparing a meal on your own, you culinary superstar. gordon ramsay would be proud. well done. well done, well done, well done.

no-more-ramen:

*~tofu parmesan + zucchini spaghetti~*

a relatively simple, quick, and tasty vegetarian and gluten free dinner! this is a special treat i cook for my boyfriend since he’s vegetarian and i’m gluten free.

ingredients

  • one zucchini
  • one package extra firm tofu
  • one egg
  • spaghetti sauce
  • salt
  • pepper
  • flour (i used gluten free all purpose baking flour)
  • olive oil / vegetable oil
  • garlic powder (optional)
  • red pepper flakes (optional)
  • italian seasoning (optional)
  • other veggies to mix with sauce such as onions, spinach, kale, etc (optional)
  • a tasty cheese that crumbles well, such as goat cheese or shredded parmesan (optional)

tools

  • knife
  • cutting board
  • regular or julienne peeler, such as this one on amazon — it’s only $11 and it’s amazing for peeling everything quickly and easily or turning so many vegetables noodle-shaped!
  • pan
  • something to flip the tofu with / stir the pan

how to

  1. first, open the package of tofu and drain. cut the tofu into large, thick slices. you don’t want it to fall apart! now, press the tofu. basically, this means to put paper towels under and on top of it, and then place something heavy on top of the paper towel to squeeze water out. any random book does the trick.
  2. while the tofu is pressing, prep the zucchini. peel it into strips length-wise with the julienne peeler. this can take some practice, but i find it to be very methodical and relaxing once i know how to do it.
  3. put the zucchini aside. crack an agg and whisk it in a bowl. place a paper towel on the counter and put a handful of whatever flour you’re using in it. now you create an assembly line: take a piece of your cut tofu, douse it in egg, and then rub flour all over it until it’s covered. 
  4. take your tofu and place it in the pan with some oil. sprinkle them with your seasonings if you have some available from the optional list above. now heat to medium high and fry those babies! flip them after only a few minutes, whenever they turn golden brown. it’s pretty quick so just be sure to check every minute or so. once they’re crispy on both sides, put them back on the paper towel where you originally put the flour while you prepare the zucchini spaghetti.
  5. if you’re adding any veggies to the sauce, sauté them in the oil leftover from the tofu. once those are soft, add the spaghetti sauce and the zucchini. since the zucchini is so thin, it will cook really quickly, in only a minute or two. at this point, add any of optional seasonings from the ingredient list. 

that’s it! plate your yummy food and sprinkle cheese on the “pasta” if you so desire. dazzle your foodie friends with your allergen inclusive masterpiece, and pat yourself on the back for preparing a meal on your own, you culinary superstar. gordon ramsay would be proud. well done. well done, well done, well done.

SUBMISSION DRIVE: SUBMIT YOUR “SIGNATURE RECIPE”

cokekitty:

no-more-ramen:

what is the one dish you always make for friends or family? that one comfort food you always love to make? maybe it’s the dish you grew up eating and still return to?

if it’s easy to prepare and not expensive to purchase the ingredients, share it with no more ramen! please, share, boost, and submit!

QUICK PROMO TIME I love these guys! No More Ramen is saving my butt this semester because I’m pretty much perpetually running on empty lol and it’s nice to know there are people out there that get that cooking is hard and expensive and time-consuming and exhausting sometimes. And they’re so accommodating! They have a vegetarian tag! And a vegan tag! Allergy tags! So many tags. So great. I don’t know how they stay so dedicated with all those tags.

I just submitted a recipe of mine (if you can call it that lol) to them and I’m excited! If you guys have a recipe or tip you think would fit here, you should submit too! Or if not, check them out anyway! Great blog. Wow. Gosh. So great. Like really.

image

THANK YOU FOR THE LOVE YOU BEAUTIFUL CULINARY ANGEL

no-more-ramen:

*~slowcooker bbq jackfruit~*

this is an easy, delicious recipe for any vegetarians out there who miss the yummy goodness that is pulled pork! that stuff on the plate above? that’s not pulled pork! it’s jackfruit, and you are going to fall in love with it.

you can find jackfruit at most asian grocery stores. you want to get the young green jackfruit in brine. that’s the best kind for this recipe! so, let’s get started. all the ingredients for this dish will run you less than $15.

ingredients

  • 2 cans young green jackfruit in brine
  • 1/2 bottle barbecue sauce of your choice
  • 1/2 jar salsa of your choice
  • salt to taste
  • a sprinkling red pepper flakes, if ya like it spicy!

instructions

  1. open the two cans of jackfruit. drain the liquid out, and rinse off the fruit, gently pressing it down to squeeze out any excess liquid. 
  2. place the jackfruit in your slow cooker. add the barbecue sauce and salsa. if you want add salt or red pepper flakes, throw them in, too. you can always omit these, taste the dish later, and add those if you want more saltiness or heat. 
  3. let it cook! i’d give it a good four hours, but, it’s really not important since it’s not meat. there’s no -required- cooking time since it’s just fruit and sauce! 

what can i do with this?

  1. pulled jackfruit sandwiches! plop those on some buns. add a side of cole slaw if you wanna get fancy.
  2. tacos! scoop into warm corn tortillas and top with shredded cheese and fresh cilantro. no need for salsa since all the spices are in the jackfruit!
  3. taquitos! roll small scoops in corn tortillas, stick a toothpick through to make it stay, and bake in the over for 10 minutes at 350 degrees.

enjoy this simple dish while dazzling all your vegetarian friends. :) tip: it’s even better the next day!

image taken from tastespace

~the big ol’ spoons masterpost~

no-more-ramen:

as many of you know, the spoon theory has been frequently discussed on this blog: what is it? who can use it? why are we discussing it here? basically, a lot of conversation about a nuanced, but very important, topic. so, welcome, to the big ol’ spoons masterpost. here, i’m going to attempt to explain as easily and thoroughly as i can what the spoon theory it is, who can use it, and why it’s important to this blog. here we go!

what is the spoon theory?

  • the spoon theory originated with christine miserandino, who used it to explain to her friend what it is like to live with lupus — you can read the full background story in this article on butyoudontlooksick.com.
  • the spoon theory is a metaphor for what people dealing with chronic illness / chronic pain go through each and every day. you can think of spoons as being comparable to a measuring unit for energy and ability to do things.
  • healthy people have a never-ending supply of spoons, i.e., you wake up, and you use your day to do what you want. you to go to work, you cook dinner, you hang out with friends, go out, watch tv, clean your house, etc. you might get tired, but you can do all those things — you have the ability, and you can pick and choose what you do.
  • chronically ill people have a limited supply of spoons, or energy / ability. their spoons very from day to day. “low spoons” days are low ability or low energy days, days where chronically ill people just can’t do as much as healthy people. so, if various activities (such as the ones listed above) cost spoons / energy, these people have to carefully plan out their day and prioritize what they would like to do with their limited energy. 
  • here is an excerpt from christine miserandino’s article linked above to illustrate just how much thought goes into living just one day with chronic illness:
  • Showering cost her spoon, just for washing her hair and shaving her legs. Reaching high and low that early in the morning could actually cost more than one spoon, but I figured I would give her a break; I didn’t want to scare her right away. Getting dressed was worth another spoon. I stopped her and broke down every task to show her how every little detail needs to be thought about. You cannot simply just throw clothes on when you are sick. I explained that I have to see what clothes I can physically put on, if my hands hurt that day buttons are out of the question. If I have bruises that day, I need to wear long sleeves, and if I have a fever I need a sweater to stay warm and so on. If my hair is falling out I need to spend more time to look presentable, and then you need to factor in another 5 minutes for feeling badly that it took you 2 hours to do all this.
  • basically, the spoon theory is used to describe the limitations of living with a chronic illness. 

who can use spoon theory to describe themselves?

  • this has always been a complicated discussion. what is abundantly clear is that spoons is not a metaphor for tiredness or laziness. spoons are not an emotion, or a hyperbole one can use to exaggerate how one is feeling. it is completely insensitive and unacceptable to people struggling with chronic illness to parallel their daily battle to a mood or lack of motivation. using this kind of language incorrectly is ableist, as it diminishes the real lived difficulties of people with chronic illness.
  • spoons can apply to people with visible and invisible illnesses. some disorders that are draining but not always readily visible to others are : depression, ptsd, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, POTS, multiple sclerosis, lupus, and endometriosis. (taken from thespoontheory.tumblr.com's FAQ)
  • you cannot use spoon theory to describe yourself if your illness is a one time occurrence and not chronic; for example, the flu. 
  • it’s debatable whether spoons can be used to describe allergic reactions — on the one hand, severe allergies require the presence of the allergen for someone’s abilities to be altered. essentially, unlimited spoons are available as long as the person takes this preventative measure. on the other hand, some argue that severe allergies can cause a multitude of other health issues, including severe anxiety. severe anxiety can absolutely limit spoons, and thus it is something to take into consideration.

why is the spoon theory important to no-more-ramen?

  • this blog is an intersectional space, meant to be filled with recipes that people of all levels of access and ability can create. so, while much of our blog caters to recipes that are inexpensive and take little time to prepare, energy levels are also important to take into consideration.
  • there are certain things that people with low spoons might be less able to do : recipes that include a lot of chopping, a lot of time standing over the stove, a lot of cleanup. this is why no-more-ramen has specific tags for needs like this.
  • the no chopping tag is exactly what it sounds like — recipes that involve no chopping or knifework. everything is frozen or from a can for easy preparation.
  • the crockpot tag is for recipes that can be placed into a slow cooker and left. that’s less time spent standing and working in the kitchen.
  • the general tips tag has not only tips for budget shopping and recipe tricks, but also suggestions to make cleanup easier on someone who doesn’t have many or any spoons left after cooking.
  • these are key things to keep in mind when submitting a recipe! you can help someone create the comfort of a home-cooked meal while sacrificing less of their ability to do things with the other parts of their day. that’s important, and awesome, and can really improve someone’s quality of life.

and there you have it! the big ol’ spoons masterpost. please let me know if you have any corrections or additions you think should be included. thank you!

show off your dish!

just a reminder that we LOVE getting pictures of recipes when you try them out! and so do our followers! <3

it’s especially awesome when you submit the photo with a link to the recipe so folks can get excited by your culinary awesomeness and then follow your lead to cook up the same recipe.